Click on the questions below to see the answers:

  • Why do I need a permit to prune vegetation that I planted?

    A permit has always been required to conduct work on Spartanburg Water-owned property. Native plants rarely require pruning and the natural habit of those trees and shrubs are preferred on the land owned by Spartanburg Water.

  • Why are you inventorying everything on my lot when all I want to do is cut a tree?

    Whenever Spartanburg Water visits property around lake, the staff is inventorying all structures and activities that are occurring on its property. Over the years, some adjacent landowners have encroached on Spartanburg Water property. It has also come to Spartanburg Water’s attention that many adjacent landowners around our reservoirs have not requested permits in their own names after purchasing a home with existing structures on Spartanburg Water-owned property. In an effort to have every adjacent landowner be in compliance, Spartanburg Water is inventorying every lot every time an application is submitted. We are also making sure that no additional encroachments exist.

  • Why do I need a permit to prune vegetation that I planted?

    A permit has always been required to conduct work on Spartanburg Water-owned property. Native plants rarely require pruning and the natural habit of those trees and shrubs are preferred on the land owned by Spartanburg Water.

  • Why should I have to plant on your property?

    Adjacent landowners to Spartanburg Water property often share the same values of maintaining a high quality source of drinking water for the community and a lake safe for recreation, so there is shared interest in ensuring that vegetation is added to filter storm water runoff.  

    In some instances, the activities requested by the adjacent homeowner require that vegetation be added to lessen the impact. It is the current practice of Spartanburg Water to only require an adjacent landowner to add vegetative buffers to mitigate for unauthorized work done on Spartanburg Water property to remediate damage. Other plantings on Spartanburg Water property may be requested by adjacent property owners for aesthetic purposes and are evaluated for their impact through the permitting process.

  • Why can’t I remove those ugly trees? I want a great view of the lake and my yard to be attractive like my neighbors’ yard.

    Spartanburg Water is committed to maintaining the vegetative buffer around Lake Blalock and Reservoir Number One. The vegetative buffer includes trees, shrubs and other lakeshore grasses, which improve water quality in the reservoirs by acting as a filter for runoff. Spartanburg Water is committed to increasing the vegetative buffer areas around Lake Bowen to decrease the impact of runoff into the reservoir.  

    With all three reservoirs, the removal of any vegetation or grasses from Spartanburg Water property is allowed on a case-by-case basis and with a permit issued from the Watershed staff. Only those trees and shrubs proving directly hazardous to personal health and/or property, as determined by Spartanburg Water staff or an ISA-certified arborist may be considered for removal.

  • Why do we have to plant native vegetation?

    We need a well vegetated buffer to slow and filter storm water runoff, prevent erosion, absorb limited pollutants and reduce nutrient into the drinking water reservoirs. Native plants are better suited for our environmental conditions and rarely need irrigation once they are established in the landscape. Native plants are more likely to develop strong root systems, provide flowers and fruit for native wildlife and self-propagate.